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Ok, being up front I'm interested in Equinox EV 2LT trim for say around $34,000 - give or take. Who knows what sticker price will finally show. The 2RS would be of interest but at say $38,000 to $40,000 I'll take a pass. When you throw in destination charge, taxes, possible dealer mark-up and a few options its out of my price range. And I'm sure for others here.

But curious - what exactly does GM mean by "limited edition" of 2RS? Is GM saying first deliveries (fall of this year) are considered special? So what makes the fall rollout of 2RS special? Versus a spring/2024 delivery of 2RS? Ahhh - early delivery? Come on.

Is GM using word "limited" because they only can produce so many in 2023? So by using the word Limited the company is using early sales tactic "we're here and now", but in reality 95% of all Equinox will come out in 2024. And how many "limited" 2RS are going to be produced and sold this year? We talking 3,000, 8,000, more?

Hate to be pessimistic but I'm feeling GM timeline to delivery EV is going to slip and be pushed back on all lines. By coming out in Sept. 2022 and pumping an EV that pretty much won't see the day of light until late Spring or more likely summer of 2024, was a rush job. Now I have to wonder if the "limited" fall release of 2RS is going to be a really low number because GM wanted to get "future buyers" attention very early in the waiting game.

If GM hasn't come out with specifics on R2S (road tests, specs, performance, cabin noise) by spring/early summer this year - then there's a good chance it won't roll out until 2024. Which means all the other trim lines could be pushed back further into 2024. Clock is ticking GM
 

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GM is currently running ads on Canadian TV showing happy customers tooling around in the Equinox EV, the Blazer EV, the electric Silverado.....and oh, yeah...the Bolt.

But only the Bolt is for sale here and even it's back-ordered according to the dealers I've contacted out West....馃槨

Talk is cheap, Chevy.....but where are the actual C-A-R-S.....?

Even Ford managed to deliver an electric F-150......馃槒
 

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You are just going to have to wait for answers like everyone else, EVnowornever.

鈥淭he 2024 Chevrolet Equinox EV will be available in fall 2023, starting with a limited edition 2RS. Additional details and ordering information will be available closer to the start of production.

Best guess is answers won't be available until this summer.

You have made it clear EVnowornever that you disagree with GM's marketing strategy for its upcoming EV's. It upsets you that Chevy is letting you know about a car that's not immediately available. It's a "car-tease" if you will. What GM is doing is using marketing to create awareness in the general population as well as garner the interest of potential buyers. It's also in no small part aimed at the financial markets. GM wants everyone to know they are going EV in a big way.

My recommendation is to just ignore this forum and Equinox news in general for now. Come back around June or so. By then maybe some or all your questions will have answers.

Talk is cheap, Chevy.....but where are the actual C-A-R-S.....?

Even Ford managed to deliver an electric F-150.
Where to start? Building a complete EV ecosystem and strategy takes time and money.

2017: All in on EV's
GM started the process in 2017 both in R&D and the financial side when they decided to go all in on EV's with a goal of being 100% EV by 2035. To do that, they developed a cohesive strategy that will be applied to all their EV's, not just a one-off like the Ford F-150. Chevy did a one-off like that that in 2010 with the Chevy Volt and again in 2017 with the Bolt EV. One-offs don't leverage across all brands and vehicle types.

"Secret Weapon": Ultium Platform
That's where the Ultium platform comes in.

Unlike taking an existing Chevy Cruise platform and shoe-horning in some batteries (Chevy Volt), or taking a Ford F-150 and shoe-horning in some batteries (F-150 Lightning), the Ultium platform is not converting existing ICE vehicles into EV's by stuffing batteries here and there. Instead, it's a new, clean sheet, ground up approach. One that can be applied to everything from the commercial GM BrightDrop EV delivery vans to GMC Hummer EV and Sierra EV, to Cadillac Lyric EV to Chevy Equinox and Blazer to Buick Electra, etc. No more one-off's, once you have a standardized platform for all vehicle types, you can start cranking out a wide variety of vehicles. Not instantly, but fairly quickly in car industry terms.

Multiple, Muti-Billion Mega Factories
All these new EV's require batteries, so GM embarked on building 4 multi-billion dollar Ultium battery factories. That's not cheap talk. The first plant is now open and production is ramping up. Two more plants are under contstruction for 2023 and 2024 opening. The 4th is still in planning stage as GM works on a new partnership outside of LG.

GM is also building new production lines and it's contracting with raw material suppliers.

Autonomous Vehicles
Meanwhile, it's also investing in Cruise Automation for robo-taxi's based on the Ultium platform. Uber, Lyft, and the like prove that not everyone wants to own and garage and maintain a car. They just want to conveniently go from A to B. Autonomous EV's are another way for GM to "sell" cars, one ride at a time. Ford recently closed their autonomous vehicle group due to financial issues. GM is way ahead of Ford on this tech as well as the financial side. The new Origin production line is underway in the Michigan plant that formerly built the Volt (and others).

The EV Faucet Is ON
The first of these new EV's coming out of the pipeline was the Hummer EV in 2021, then the Cadillac Lyric and BrightDrop delivery vans in 2022, the Chevy Blazer EV is this summer, the Equinox EV and Silverado EV and the Hummer SUV EV this fall, the GMC Sierra EV and the Buick Electra EV in 2024. The list goes on.

Summary
You can focus on one-trick-ponies like the Mustang EV or the Lightning, but GM decided a unified, standardized platform that can be easily used across all its brands across all its vehicles across all its price range was better in the long run, even if it meant Ford could steal some early PR. GM has and is investing many, many, many billions in its new EV strategy. It's executing that strategy, it's even telling you about that strategy. That's not cheap talk, you just haven't been paying close attention. :)
 

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No way the 2LT it will be 34K. Probably 37K, because the "30K" 1LT will probably become at least a 31K 1LT

My reasoning is:

The 2LT has the larger range, so I think that's the highest option out of the list. So let's say that's about 3K (USD). Then, there's the 17" screen, that's another 1K. Roof rails=$500, lightbar=$500. That's the 5K difference I see. I made it 6K because I think they might be greedier.
 

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Well, obviously I'm sold on The General's Ultium battery strategy, or else I wouldn't be waiting for a Chevy EQ EV to get released.... 馃槒

However.....GMs domestic (and foreign) competition in the EV space is nothing to sneeze at....

Ford's Mach-E has been on the roads since 2021....the Ford Lightning electric truck hit the roads last year, and Ford has plans to build 150,000 this year at two plants - the Ford Dearborn Truck plant and the Ford Kansas City Assembly plant.

Meanwhile, GM says it will be selling the Silverado EV starting in 2024.....probably in limited numbers.

Can GM catch up to the Lightning sales in a few years? We'll see....

馃

Just my $0.02....
 

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Ford's Mach-E has been on the roads since 2021....the Ford Lightning electric truck hit the roads last year, and Ford has plans to build 150,000 this year at two plants - the Ford Dearborn Truck plant and the Ford Kansas City Assembly plant.
Yes, and GM decided against doing more custom one-offs in favor of creating one standard platform that can underpin many different vehicles. Ford's approach requires every vehicle to be a custom one-off which is more costly and slower over the long haul. Again, GM did the one-offs in 2010 and 2017. Been there, done that, learned from it, now it's moved to a "whole 'nother level" to facilitate mass production over a wide range of vehicles. So it's apples and oranges.

As a result GM now has 9 EV's in the pipeline for its North American market that started with the Hummer EV in 2021. Ford is now working on creating its own platform of course, but they are behind on that. We will see better how all this shakes out in the two years between now and 2025 and whether the wait was worth it.

I think GM will be successful, but it all comes down to execution and how the inevitable unforeseable market surprises (such Covid, chip shortages, Ukraine, economy) are handled.
 

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I think GM missed a real opportunity when they brought out the Hummer EV. A waste of resources that could have been targeted for the mainstream Equinox.
At first glance, sure.

Now factor in they wanted to make a big, bold statement; they had limited Ultium battery supply; those batteries would be more expensive than those coming off up-to-speed production lines from two battery plants in 2024, and then factor in that many considered big, beefy trucks a road too far for EV's. Two years after the Hummer EV and Cybertrucks are still not rolling off the assembly line.

Result?

The Hummer EV, proof that GM could design and build a big beefy EV in record time (about 24 months) at a price that can also absorb a higher battery cost and at a sales volume that could be satisfied on the supply side. Barely. It also put them 2 years closer to having a Silverado EV since much of the platform work for big and beefy would be transferrable. Ditto for the Cadillac Lyric. Big $, low volume, and a statement in elegance. YMMV

Another $30k compact SUV would not get the same headlines, the batteries would not be available in the quantity and price point to support a $30k-ish sell price, and they already had a vehicle in that range: the Bolt EV and EUV.

Of course you, and I and others here would be happier had they built the Equinox EV first. Would you have paid an extra $5k or more for all trim levels? There's more than one reason the Equinox EV is coming after the more expensive models. Think scaled up battery production, lower cost batteries for one. The one Ultium plant is still ramping up. The second is due in 2023 sometime, the third in 2024. If the Equinox is intended to be mass volume with a $30k-ish trim level it will need lots of inexpensive batteries. 2024 may just provide both.

At least, that's how I see it, sprinkled with some extra curricular reading on what's been going on at GM from a book by David Welch.
 

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One other reason to go with the Hummer EV as their first Ultium platform was the ability for GM to validate the battery manufacturing process. As it turned out, GM had to fix every Hummer EV and Brightdrop delivery van to check and potentially replace the battery modules. This impacted only a couple hundred vehicles, and many of them were waiting for delivery. GM found a flaw in the module seals that could have allowed water to enter the module. They fixed this in the factory and then quietly fixed all the delivered vehicles (it was something dealerships could do).
 

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GM found a flaw in the module seals that could have allowed water to enter the module
Two flaws actually.

After the August 2022 announcement that there was a problem with the Hummer EV鈥檚 high-voltage connector that could allow water into the battery pack, GM found another problem. Apparently, water could still get inside Hummer EV battery packs due to improper flange sealing, which could cause the vehicles to either not start or suddenly lose power during operation.

GM said the root cause of the issue has to do with improperly primed or electrocoated battery pack flanges 鈥渋nhibiting proper adhesion of the urethane sealant.鈥

The low volume battery packs were manufactured by Magna International.
 

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At first glance, sure.

Now factor in they wanted to make a big, bold statement; they had limited Ultium battery supply; those batteries would be more expensive than those coming off up-to-speed production lines from two battery plants in 2024, and then factor in that many considered big, beefy trucks a road too far for EV's. Two years after the Hummer EV and Cybertrucks are still not rolling off the assembly line.

Result?

The Hummer EV, proof that GM could design and build a big beefy EV in record time (about 24 months) at a price that can also absorb a higher battery cost and at a sales volume that could be satisfied on the supply side. Barely. It also put them 2 years closer to having a Silverado EV since much of the platform work for big and beefy would be transferrable. Ditto for the Cadillac Lyric. Big $, low volume, and a statement in elegance. YMMV

Another $30k compact SUV would not get the same headlines, the batteries would not be available in the quantity and price point to support a $30k-ish sell price, and they already had a vehicle in that range: the Bolt EV and EUV.

Of course you, and I and others here would be happier had they built the Equinox EV first. Would you have paid an extra $5k or more for all trim levels? There's more than one reason the Equinox EV is coming after the more expensive models. Think scaled up battery production, lower cost batteries for one. The one Ultium plant is still ramping up. The second is due in 2023 sometime, the third in 2024. If the Equinox is intended to be mass volume with a $30k-ish trim level it will need lots of inexpensive batteries. 2024 may just provide both.

At least, that's how I see it, sprinkled with some extra curricular reading on what's been going on at GM from a book by David Welch.
I understand your argument. Here is my counter point. Imo the Hummer EV was/is more of a marketing stunt. The whole "Look what this Ultium platform can do. It can turn one of the most infamous gas guzzlers into a green vehicle" (Understanding this point has been refuted by many and GM has yet to really acknowledge this). The low volume high margin vehicle would at least offet some costs of development. The problem I have with it is if marketing this platform through the introduction of this vehicle was the goal I feel like they failed. Instead, I feel like they should have gone the route of Hyundai with the I5 or Ford with the Mach-e. A vehicle that is more affordable to many, well designed and really generates consumer interest. Not to mention you can almost fit 3 I5 battery backs in a Hummer, so they would be able to get out 3x the amount of vehicles with the same battery supply. If I were GM, I would have started with the Lyric first and brought the Hummer in years down the road. Maybe they would have had the lyrics manufacturing sorted out a year or two ago and we would see them everywhere.
 
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