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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Are we able to rustproof an EV without voiding the warranty? I know Hyundai won't allow it from some forums I read, but can anyone in Canada with a bolt or something confirm?

I mean, EVs still have rocker panels and quarter panels. The frame is a different story, but because I like keeping my cars 10+ years, I'd like the option to fully rustproof without voiding the warranty.

I'll be using "surface shield" (lanolin based) for the exterior of the frame\panels, and "corrosion-free" for inner cavities.

I do that (also with my current vehicle) based on the Canadian armed forces test for rustproofing products (see link), and the tests this guy did (see other link).

Corrosion free test:

Surface shield test:

I might just warn the surface shield cans and do the inner cavities with that as well.
 

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When I was much younger, one of my first jobs was selling and training dealers to do rustproofing. It was a snake oil racket and your car ended up with a lot of holes (drilled for spray wand access) that would rust even though plugged with a plastic cap. Paint treatments was another service like that.

I too keep my cars a long time. The Volt replaced a 21 year old car. The Bolt replace a 15 year old car. In my experience, cars around that age will see rust holes in some fender or lower side body or door panels. If the car is a keeper, cutting out the rusted area and welding in a new piece is the way to go. Fiberglass will be temporary as the rust creeps under it's edges.

The Linked Canada PDF
The linked Canadian armed services PDF on corrosion control found significant rust at 18 years on all kinds of equipment. The recommendations are to keeps things covered from the elements, keep them in a lower humidity environment, inspect and repair annually (apply special coatings, paint, weld new metal, etc.) , and to make the equipment from rust-resistant materials to begin with.

Back in 70's cars were generally not using rust resistant galvanized steel. Body parts where basically painted steel. They rusted out.

Car Materials Today
Galvanized steel is standard practice today, at least for GM and others. Cars today are built with a lot more rust resistant materials, treatments, and designed for water drainage. Still If you look under a 10 year old car you'll see some surface rust on nuts, bolts, etc. Not a safety issue like my old VW Beetle's floor boards rusting through where you could see the road below you while driving!!

But saying (in the video) you're going to have body panel rust holes you can put your fingers through? My 11+ year old Volt looks the same as the day I bought it (barring a few nicks, scratches). I'm in Chicago, we get plenty of snow, ice, and road salt. I also wash the car frequently winter and summer including the underside. Unlike prepaing turkey, I prefer not to dry brine my cars, lol.

Corrosion/ Rust Through Warranties
Under the Chevy Corrosion Protection warranty, all body and sheet metal components are warranted by against corrosion for the first 3 years/36,000 miles and under the Rust Through Protection warranty rust-through protection lasts for the first 6 years/100,000 miles, whichever comes first. Application of additional rust-inhibiting materials is neither necessary nor required under the Sheet Metal Coverage.
Chevrolet Owners | Warranty Information

For my Bolt EV:
After-Manufacture “Rustproofing”
A “Maintenance Record” is provided
in the maintenance schedule section of the owner manual for recording services performed.
Your vehicle was designed and built to resist corrosion. Application of
additional rust-inhibiting materials is neither necessary nor required under the Sheet Metal Coverage. GM makes no recommendations
concerning the usefulness or value of such products.

Application of after-manufacture rustproofing products may create an
environment which reduces the corrosion resistance built into your vehicle. Repairs to correct damage
caused by such applications are not covered under your New Vehicle Limited Warranty.
Use Common Sense
If you want to paint or otherwise coat nuts, bolts and the like to add a layer of protection, go ahead. I doubt it will void the warranty. However, I'd avoid spraying gunk into holes and channels as many are designed to allow drainage. Gunking them up could create the problem you are looking to avoid. Some coating may trap moisture to the metal surface. If the car can't dry or drain as designed because of your aftermarket rustproofing, Chevy will say that's on you. And definitely don't drill any access holes, a sure way to cause rust and again that would be on you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Okay... So:
1. Galvanized will still rust with time.
2. I can see (and my mechanic confirms) the results of liquid rustproofing. My Santa Fe doesn't have a spec of rust after 12 years, while other Santa Fe's I see on the road so do. Especially the frame.
3. You don't have to drill holes. Everything is accessible if you have a good wand, and patience.
4. A warranty against perforation for 6 years is useless. It usually takes much longer than 6 years for rust to actually perforate. And until it does, it makes your car looks like a pile of junk.
5. The linked Canadian armed forces test showed that these products are efficient against the control. Look at the charts.
6. Rubberized undercoating (painting) is not comparable to liquid rustproofing... It's worse than not doing anything at all.
7. Chicago is no comparison to Montreal, when we get 32⁰c summers and there's salt on the road 5 months every year.
8. "Gunk" will still end up everywhere water can get into, because the world is full of it. It's in the air and the water that splashes... So the water won't drain correctly anyways.
9. When you wash the underbody, it doesn't flush the pinch-welds from within, not does it make its way into the frame cavities (at least not enough).

So, I'm not sure what you sold. You might be confusing between undercoating and rustproofing... But as a tech for 7 years at Mazda and Ford, I can tell you that rustproofing works, but not the electronic kind, and not undercoating.
 

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Just pointing out what the warranties cover and what they say since you asked about voiding the warranty. The report did not review the material from the video. At the end of the day it's your car, your choice.

32°C is 89°F which we do get (and 100°F/38°C are not unknown in Chicago). Not sure how that's relevant. Salting started this month and will last through March or possibly April, so that's 5 months or so. Again, my 11+ year Volt has no body panel rust, no rust through, no aftermarket rustproofing. I don't expect that to change in the next two years by which time I'll hopefully have a Chevy Equinox EV to replace it.

Rusty Jones was sold as a rustproofing. They went bankrupt from claims long after I decided it was not the product or job for me. I quit after 4 months.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Just pointing out what the warranties cover and what they say since you asked about voiding the warranty. The report did not review the material from the video. At the end of the day it's your car, your choice.

32°C is 89°F which we do get (and 100°F/38°C are not unknown in Chicago). Not sure how that's relevant. Salting started this month and will last through March or possibly April, so that's 5 months or so. Again, my 11+ year Volt has no body panel rust, no rust through, no aftermarket rustproofing. I don't expect that to change in the next two years by which time I'll hopefully have a Chevy Equinox EV to replace it.

Rusty Jones was sold as a rustproofing. They went bankrupt from claims long after I decided it was not the product or job for me. I quit after 4 months.
I've seen Mazda 6s (2008-2012) completely broke (can't drive the vehicle), and I've seen ones on almost new condition because they did their rustproofing.

Now, way before they broke, they were rusting out. I see rusted rocker panels on Santa Fe's identical to mine all the time, and mine is completely solid with 0 rust on the panels or the inner cavities (I looked with a borescope). Yes, some vehicles don't rust even without rustproofing, but that depends on too many uncontrollable variables, like: How many chips you have in the factory protective coating? Were there any defects in manufacturing that made the coating too thin or missed a few spots? These things are almost impossible to catch when you buy the vehicle, so I like to cover my bases.

That report shows "corrosion formula 3000", which is made by "corrosion free"... That's what I use for inner cavities. They haven't tested "surface shield" because it's a brand new product on the market.

I guess I'll have to ask the dealer if the warranty holds up if I rustproof with no holes drilled.
 

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I guess I'll have to ask the dealer if the warranty holds up if I rustproof with no holes drilled.
That's my takeaway. Don't do anything (like drilling holes or plugging drain channels) that the dealer can claim caused the rusting. Also whatever somebody at the dealer says on this, they could disavow "what somebody said 10 years in the past" unless it's in writing and part of the purchase agreement.

Can't hurt to get their do's and dont's view on the subject. I would not be surprised if they came back with "no problem as long as we apply the rustproofing".
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
That's my takeaway. Don't do anything (like drilling holes or plugging drain channels) that the dealer can claim caused the rusting. Also whatever somebody at the dealer says on this, they could disavow "what somebody said 10 years in the past" unless it's in writing and part of the purchase agreement.

Can't hurt to get their do's and dont's view on the subject. I would not be surprised if they came back with "no problem as long as we apply the rustproofing".
I don't trust their rustproofing. I always do my own because I take my time and go over everything. I know how they do it because I've worked there. There is the cheapest pull (Krown) and do a "once over". I'll NEVER drill holes or plug drain ports.
 

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Yup, same reason I rotate my own tires. Too many stories of the dealer (or tire shop) forgetting to relearn the TPMS. not looking for nails, etc. working their way into the tread.

And sometimes over torquing the nuts. Insert your own cheap joke there... :)

I don't trust their rustproofing.
Which implies they do rustproofing and it must not void the warranty. OR, they have their own warranty which may or may not provide the coverage you want, assuming the company is still around at the time it may be needed in 15, 18 or 20 years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yup, same reason I rotate my own tires. Too many stories of the dealer (or tire shop) forgetting to relearn the TPMS. not looking for nails, etc. working their way into the tread.

And sometimes over torquing the nuts. Insert your own cheap joke there... :)



Which implies they do rustproofing and it must not void the warranty. OR, they have their own warranty which may or may not provide the coverage you want, assuming the company is still around at the time it may be needed in 15, 18 or 20 years.
"SOMETIMES"???. They ALWAYS over-torque the lug nuts!

I do all the work that's not under warranty on my car. Yes, some idiot sold me an aftermarket warranty with no time limit, up to 180Kkm. Joke's on them, because they already paid for 2.5X repairs than what the warranty was. I'm at 170K right now, and it will take another 2 years until I'll get to 180K. Hopefully, by then, I'll have the Equinox. I do my own breaks, spark plugs (not easy on the V6), filters (very easy), etc. I'm not allowed to do my own oil changes though, because that will void the warranty.

Yes, Mazda and Ford are fine with rustproofing, but I don't know about their EVs. I stopped working there at 2020, before their EVs were out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You break your brakes? haha.

Oh, I thought you were referring to the Chevy dealer's rustproofing, MaybeFutureBuyer.
Sorry...Swipe keyboard. You got the point :)
Naaa...I never had a Chevy. I was never a fan of their ICE vehicles' reliability, but their EVs/PHEVs are SOLID (well, they were the first to make an EV back in the 70s). The Equinox might be the first "Domestic" car I've ever owned!

BTW, go answer my poll!
 

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Watched a video from the formula 3000 folks. Immediately noticed the applicator was not wearing protective breathing gear, no mask, nothing. Someone commented about it and the company said no mask needed because the stuff is non-toxic. Sorry that's the same "no mask needed" B.S. that Rusty Jones was saying to installers and one big reason I quit. There's no way inhaling aerosol rustproofing is good for lungs.

What I saw in the company-made video was gunk filling and dripping from weep holes. The way they were spraying the engine compartment and other areas just made me think whoever has to later work on the car is going to get that sticky stuff all over their clothes and hands. Read their warranty. They can limit you to one claim, painting a rusted area they "repair" is at your expense, to keep the warranty you need to have the stuff applied by a certified installer, and reapplied regularly within 30 days of a set schedule. I understand they want to limit their exposure but I also would not bank on that warranty.

Again, your car, your money. In my case, I spend money on a clear bra for various leading edges on the car paint. Instead of rust-proofing, chip proofing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Watched a video from the formula 3000 folks. Immediately noticed the applicator was not wearing protective breathing gear, no mask, nothing. Someone commented about it and the company said no mask needed because the stuff is non-toxic. Sorry that's the same "no mask needed" B.S. that Rusty Jones was saying to installers and one big reason I quit. There's no way inhaling aerosol rustproofing is good for lungs.

What I saw in the company-made video was gunk filling and dripping from weep holes. The way they were spraying the engine compartment and other areas just made me think whoever has to later work on the car is going to get that sticky stuff all over their clothes and hands. Read their warranty. They can limit you to one claim, painting a rusted area they "repair" is at your expense, to keep the warranty you need to have the stuff applied by a certified installer, and reapplied regularly within 30 days of a set schedule. I understand they want to limit their exposure but I also would not bank on that warranty.

Again, your car, your money. In my case, I spend money on a clear bra for various leading edges on the car paint. Instead of rust-proofing, chip proofing.
I'll address your points one by one:

1. Mask: maybe because it's silicone based... But I don't really care, since I do my own rustproofing. In the video, they might take the time to do it right, but in real life they don't!

2. Rust is usually from the inside out. Surface rust isn't the real "killer", so clear bra does nothing for rust. Every spring, go over the entire body panels and fix chips with a paint correction pen. That will help surface rust. I'm trying to prevent rust from the inside, like your wheel wells, your frame, trunk lid, hood, etc.

3. My mechanic LOVES working on my car, because he rather have some oil, over doing 3X the work to remove rusted parts with a torch. I was also a mechanic, and we were thrilled when we got a rustproofed vehicle. The job is dirty no matter what, so we didn't care. It doesn't drip 1-2 days after it has been applied... So it's not a big deal.

4. Warranty. Again, I don't care because I do it myself. I can see that it's working, so I don't need their warranty. I do it once every 2 years on the frame's inner cavities, and once a year on the frame, draining channels, wheel wells, rocker panels, etc. I prefer the warranty of it actually done right, then trying to get them to pay for repairs because they rush things up. It also a lot cheaper that way.
 

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Based on your other posts I'd say your application method is probably 100X better than what I saw in the company video, Maybe. Mine would be too.

Silicon, whatever. I'd wear a mask. And goggles. My health is way more valuable.

And you can do your own seasonal reapplication.

Yes, between a rusted nut and one with gunk that comes off more easily. I too would choose the latter. Of course it mean somebody needs to reapply to those nuts, bolts, etc. after the car has been serviced. I'll just say the Chevy technician won't be doing it, nor would I want to pay their hourly rate for that.But that means I need to do it. Could be a pain as I don't have a lift.

Forget the warranty, what you are after is less or no rust. The "warranty" is there as a comfort blanket and a carrot/stick to get owners to the certified installer every year creating a revenue stream.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Based on your other posts I'd say your application method is probably 100X better than what I saw in the company video, Maybe. Mine would be too.

Silicon, whatever. I'd wear a mask. And goggles. My health is way more valuable.

And you can do your own seasonal reapplication.

Yes, between a rusted nut and one with gunk that comes off more easily. I too would choose the latter. Of course it mean somebody needs to reapply to those nuts, bolts, etc. after the car has been serviced. I'll just say the Chevy technician won't be doing it, nor would I want to pay their hourly rate for that.But that means I need to do it. Could be a pain as I don't have a lift.

Forget the warranty, what you are after is less or no rust. The "warranty" is there as a comfort blanket and a carrot/stick to get owners to the certified installer every year creating a revenue stream.
You don't have to reapply after every part replaced. The fact that you go over it annually will do the trick just fine. Yes, pretty much anyone who can watch 2 YouTube videos will apply better than the "professionals", the only time it's okay to go somewhere is if you're in no shape to apply it yourself, because it's still better than nothing.

Correct again about the warranty they give you, it's just there to get you back. I'm 99% certain no one got paid to replace their frame if it did rust out.
 
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