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AFAIK,
11.5 kW Level 2 (AC) charging, 3RS has an optional 19.2 kW Level 2 (AC) charging
150 kW Level 3 DCFC

300 miles FWD
280 miles eAWD
 

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Thanks, and how long does it take to change 150 kW Level 3 DCFC?
I hope a software update will bring it over 300 miles for AWD.
About 70 miles in 10 minutes assuming the battery is low. DCFC charge rate tapers as the battery fills to avoid cooking the battery. Pull in with a 90% full battery may take 10 minutes to add 10 miles (or something). I have not seen any DCFC charging curves for the Equinox EV, but here are some examples; Common DC Fast Charging Curves and How to Find Yours | ChargePoint

AWD ranges will always be less. The components required to drive the other wheels adds extra weight, some friction loss, and may still use power when not in use. That's generally the case regardless of brand.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
About 70 miles in 10 minutes assuming the battery is low. DCFC charge rate tapers as the battery fills to avoid cooking the battery. Pull in with a 90% full battery may take 10 minutes to add 10 miles (or something). I have not seen any DCFC charging curves for the Equinox EV, but here are some examples; Common DC Fast Charging Curves and How to Find Yours | ChargePoint

AWD ranges will always be less. The components required to drive the other wheels to add extra weight, and some friction loss, and may still use power when not in use. That's generally the case regardless of brand.
I am just worried that in 2 years' time the competition might offer more. I hope the Eq makes more improvements.
 

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I am just worried that in 2 years' time the competition might offer more. I hope the Eq makes more improvements.
You shouldn't "worry" about competition, you should be happy about it! If there's something better by the time the Equinox is out, get back your deposit, and choose the better car.

I'm doubtful that any other manufacturers will make an EV with an upgradable and serviceable battery like the Ultium platform has... And that's one of the deal-breakers for me. I'm not paying 20K for a new battery after 10 years!
 

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Once you buy your vehicle, I agree be happy with what you have. The EV world is in a rapid change mode and I will guarantee that as each year passes that another vehicle will come out with improvements, especially in range and charging speed.

If you decide to wait for another vehicle, by the time that one arrives, there will be better vehicles.

I am going into the purchase of any EV right now with my eyes wide open, knowing that it will be much outdated, 3-5 years after I purchase it. It will still be a very good vehicle and will be helping the environment right away.

For us It will be replacing a 15 year old vehicle and we plan to keep the vehicle for a long time. We are retired and on a fixed income, so buying vehicles every few years is a thing of the past. When I was younger and working, it would be nothing to buy a new vehicle every two to three years. If someone else is now in that position, they can simply go out and buy new technology and range and faster charging times, as advances pop up
 

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This discussion reminds me of whether I should buy a computer today knowing that there will be a "better" one every 6 months for the next 20 years. Perpetually waiting because there will be something better coming is not a solution.

If the car fits your needs now, buy it. Cars that come along later don't affect the utility of the car you bought. A future car with a bigger screen or more range or a different style does not make my car outdated if it still gets me from point A to point B. And at some point, the car could become cherished. Is a 1962 Corvette outdated or a great piece of nostalgia? Technology-wise it's outdated. No seat belts, no dash navigation, no power windows, etc. But if it still runs, you have an awesome heirloom.

If you really are concerned about being somehow left behind, buy a 2 year old Bolt, drive it for 3 years, sell it for almost what you paid for it. Still concerned? Buy a 2 year old off-lease Equinox EV, rinse and repeat. Buying a new car only makes $ sense if you keep them. Otherwise you take a big depreciation hit (in normal times) switching cars every few years.

I took it further, I always bought used and kept them. The money I saved doing that and avoiding leases (among other things) helped build my retirement portfolio. The Volt and Bolt—besides being my first GM cars—where the first new cars I ever owned.

I'd be keeping the Volt longer if I could, but it's not using the Ultium platform and that means replacing battery components from a very limited (and aging) supply of used, salvaged cars is an expensive problem. GM has addressed that with the Ultium design. Whatever is coming out the factory at the time will work, plus there should be a LOT of used bricks available via salvage yards given they will be used across GM's entire portfolio rather than a one-off for one low-volume model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There is a new company called Vinfast that allows you to "rent" the batteries or the option to buy them with the car. I wonder if that's similar to the Ultium that will allow you to replace the battery once it is outdated. VinFast
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This discussion reminds me of whether I should buy a computer today knowing that there will be a "better" one every 6 months for the next 20 years. Perpetually waiting because there will be something better coming is not a solution.

If the car fits your needs now, buy it. Cars that come along later don't affect the utility of the car you bought. A future car with a bigger screen or more range or a different style does not make my car outdated if it still gets me from point A to point B. And at some point, the car could become cherished. Is a 1962 Corvette outdated or a great piece of nostalgia? Technology-wise it's outdated. No seat belts, no dash navigation, no power windows, etc. But if it still runs, you have an awesome heirloom.

If you really are concerned about being somehow left behind, buy a 2 year old Bolt, drive it for 3 years, sell it for almost what you paid for it. Still concerned? Buy a 2 year old off-lease Equinox EV, rinse and repeat. Buying a new car only makes $ sense if you keep them. Otherwise you take a big depreciation hit (in normal times) switching cars every few years.

I took it further, I always bought used and kept them. The money I saved doing that and avoiding leases (among other things) helped build my retirement portfolio. The Volt and Bolt—besides being my first GM cars—where the first new cars I ever owned.

I'd be keeping the Volt longer if I could, but it's not using the Ultium platform and that means replacing battery components from a very limited (and aging) supply of used, salvaged cars is an expensive problem. GM has addressed that with the Ultium design. Whatever is coming out the factory at the time will work, plus there should be a LOT of used bricks available via salvage yards given they will be used across GM's entire portfolio rather than a one-off for one low-volume model.
Yes, looking at it from a just a vehicle perspective is the correct way at looking at it and buying something that is two years old or so. This would make sense to me if it was an ICE vehicle. Being that EVs are technically new and very new to me as I never bought one or experienced having one other than a 15 minute test drive is both exciting and nervous.
The nervous part is the fear of getting stuck or going to a charing station that doesn't work. But I know even if I bought a very expensive German car (ICE) failures are likely to happen too.
I am just glad that my current car is still working well despite the fact that exhaust comes out of it.
I will still keep my eyes on the EQ. :)
 

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There is a new company called Vinfast that allows you to "rent" the batteries or the option to buy them with the car. I wonder if that's similar to the Ultium that will allow you to replace the battery once it is outdated. VinFast
I've talked to them a few months ago. I decided against that because:

1. They reserve the right to increase the lease price of the battery at any time. And with the battery, it's $65K (!!!) For the VF8.

2. They are VERY expensive considering the battery isn't yours (55K)

3. No dealerships, so who knows how long you'll have to wait for a fix, and parts availability might be an issue. Tesla owners sometimes wait for 4 MONTHS to get someone to look at their car, and sometimes even longer for parts.

4. Their battery is one solid module, like the rest of EVs out there.

At the time I spoke with them, they didn't have the option of owning the battery... So I didn't priced that out.

Edit: HOLY COW, when I've contacted them a few months ago, the subscription for low mileage drivers was $60, now the only option is "unlimited" for $260\month! That's $31K in 10 years! Wayyyy more than what a full battery replacement cost!

Sorry, but I advise you NOT to take that option. It's a HORRIBLE deal.
 

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This discussion reminds me of whether I should buy a computer today knowing that there will be a "better" one every 6 months for the next 20 years. Perpetually waiting because there will be something better coming is not a solution.

If the car fits your needs now, buy it. Cars that come along later don't affect the utility of the car you bought. A future car with a bigger screen or more range or a different style does not make my car outdated if it still gets me from point A to point B. And at some point, the car could become cherished. Is a 1962 Corvette outdated or a great piece of nostalgia? Technology-wise it's outdated. No seat belts, no dash navigation, no power windows, etc. But if it still runs, you have an awesome heirloom.

If you really are concerned about being somehow left behind, buy a 2 year old Bolt, drive it for 3 years, sell it for almost what you paid for it. Still concerned? Buy a 2 year old off-lease Equinox EV, rinse and repeat. Buying a new car only makes $ sense if you keep them. Otherwise you take a big depreciation hit (in normal times) switching cars every few years.

I took it further, I always bought used and kept them. The money I saved doing that and avoiding leases (among other things) helped build my retirement portfolio. The Volt and Bolt—besides being my first GM cars—where the first new cars I ever owned.

I'd be keeping the Volt longer if I could, but it's not using the Ultium platform and that means replacing battery components from a very limited (and aging) supply of used, salvaged cars is an expensive problem. GM has addressed that with the Ultium design. Whatever is coming out the factory at the time will work, plus there should be a LOT of used bricks available via salvage yards given they will be used across GM's entire portfolio rather than a one-off for one low-volume model.
Same here. NEVER bought new even when I had enough to buy one CASH. It (used to be) the worst financial move ever. I'm buying new now just because:
1. I wouldn't get an EV without a serviceable battery.
2. These days, used are as expensive (sometimes more expensive) than new.

I'm a little worried because my 2010 Santa Fe is already failing at a pretty fast rate (about $1K repairs every 10Kkm). I'm lucky I'm not paying for those repairs because I have a no-time-limit warranty... But as soon as that's over (about 1.5-2 more years with my mileage), it will be a burden.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've talked to them a few months ago. I decided against that because:

1. They reserve the right to increase the lease price of the battery at any time. And with the battery, it's $65K (!!!) For the VF8.

2. They are VERY expensive considering the battery isn't yours (55K)

3. No dealerships, so who knows how long you'll have to wait for a fix, and parts availability might be an issue. Tesla owners sometimes wait for 4 MONTHS to get someone to look at their car, and sometimes even longer for parts.

4. Their battery is one solid module, like the rest of EVs out there.

At the time I spoke with them, they didn't have the option of owning the battery... So I didn't priced that out.

Edit: HOLY COW, when I've contacted them a few months ago, the subscription for low mileage drivers was $60, now the only option is "unlimited" for $260\month! That's $31K in 10 years! Wayyyy more than what a full battery replacement cost!

Sorry, but I advise you NOT to take that option. It's a HORRIBLE deal.
= Not for me.
 

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I have a running dialogue with a Volt forum member who insists GM must offer a battery replacement subscription option for him the "trust" the Ultium platform. I did a quick analysis and asked if they'd be OK paying $217/month for the life of the car. They said no, were thinking more along the lines of a one-time $3k. Based on this Vinfast, it looks like I was not far off the mark. And the Vinfast battery replacement rental is IN ADDITION to buying the car.

This is just a glorified lay-away plan. You don't need them to do this. Just put $217/month in your own savings account. You even get to keep the interest earned! :)
 

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I have a running dialogue with a Volt forum member who insists GM must offer a battery replacement subscription option for him the "trust" the Ultium platform. I did a quick analysis and asked if they'd be OK paying $217/month for the life of the car. They said no, were thinking more along the lines of a one-time $3k. Based on this Vinfast, it looks like I was not far off the mark. And the Vinfast battery replacement rental is IN ADDITION to buying the car.

This is just a glorified lay-away plan. You don't need them to do this. Just put $217/month in your own savings account. You even get to keep the interest earned! :)
Not only that... But no one will need that much. A battery is about 13K now. 8 years forward will probably be cheaper, let's say 9K. 217\month for 8 years is 21K, so even if you earn no interest, you can still buy 2 be batteries+change once the car is out of warranty. And the chances that the battery will die exactly when the warranty is over are very slim. So you'll probably save closer to 26K (10 years).

Don't get me wrong, I'm a sucker for long warranties... But not if there's close to 0 chance I'll ever break even. If Chevy will offer a no time limit 160Kkm (100 mile) warranty bumper to bumper, I'm willing to pay an extra 4K for it. The infotainment screen alone probably cost that much. Now add all the other gizmos, each LED unit is $1500, window motors and regulators, door latches, all the suspension parts, battery cooling system, heat pump, etc. If only one or two of these break, you saved money by taking the warranty.
 

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If Chevy will offer a no time limit 160Kkm (100 mile) warranty bumper to bumper, I'm willing to pay an extra 4K for it.
All the extended warranties I have seen for Chevy have a time/mile limit so I doubt there will be one that doesn't. But you never know.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Not only that... But no one will need that much. A battery is about 13K now. 8 years forward will probably be cheaper, let's say 9K. 217\month for 8 years is 21K, so even if you earn no interest, you can still buy 2 be batteries+change once the car is out of warranty. And the chances that the battery will die exactly when the warranty is over are very slim. So you'll probably save closer to 26K (10 years).

Don't get me wrong, I'm a sucker for long warranties... But not if there's close to 0 chance I'll ever break even. If Chevy will offer a no time limit 160Kkm (100 mile) warranty bumper to bumper, I'm willing to pay an extra 4K for it. The infotainment screen alone probably cost that much. Now add all the other gizmos, each LED unit is $1500, window motors and regulators, door latches, all the suspension parts, battery cooling system, heat pump, etc. If only one or two of these break, you saved money by taking the warranty.
If that's the case, I will go with one with less bells and whistles. I don't want to repeat my "VW Days" when a lot of parts broke down and I was paying just to sell the car.
 
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